Five Things You Should Know about Noah Everett

For those of you who are unaware, today is a special day that occurs only once a year: National Boss Day.  It is on this day that we are asked to take some time to commemorate the person who keeps the company running, the money flowing, and the employees happy.

Here at TwitPic, we wanted to celebrate this day in style.  Rather than posting a tweet saying something lame like “Happy National Boss Day!”, we’ve decided to put a little more creativity behind it.

So, without further ado, I give you: Five Things You Should Know about Noah Everett.

#1. Noah is really Johnny Knoxville in disguise.

While most of the time Noah does an awesome job of covering this up, sometimes Johnny begins to show through.  Who would have known the crazed stuntman who appears in such films as Jackass, Jackass 2, Jackass 3D, and Men in Black II is also a successful social media entrepreneur?  We were surprised when we discovered this too, but we have to admit… we’re cool with it as long as he doesn’t decide to play frisbee with our Macbook Pros.

#2. Noah is an aspiring mirror model.

When you’re an entrepreneur, your job is to keep an eye out for whats hot and whats new. Attempting to stay ahead of the curve, Noah has been practicing his mirror modeling skills in order to keep up with the latest trend in personal photography. I think the pictures speak for themselves here.

#3. Noah has had a love affair with his computer.

“Hello clarice, it’s good to see you”

This racy photo was posted to his TwitPic account back in December, 2009. The photo caption seems to be hinting at some kind of complex love affair that only a true programmer would fall into. It is believed that TwitPic is the child produced by Noah and this computer, although a different computer may be the real father. The investigation continues.

#4. Noah is such a pro photo-bomber that he even bombs his own photos.

This photo-bomb was taken at the latest Chirp conference in San Francisco with none other than the musical genius that is BT. As you can see from Noah’s crazed expression, he clearly couldn’t pass up an opportunity to photo-bomb a picture as epic as this. For shame, Noah, for shame.

#5. This is what sexy looks like.

@twitpicmom thinks this has something to do with buying the pink plastic swimming pool instead of the toy machine gun that he wanted for his 8th birthday.

Ok, but really…

So maybe not all of these things are true, but one thing definitely is: Noah is an awesome boss. His laid-back attitude combined with his passion is what helps to make our job so enjoyable. His views are truly that of a “startup company”: avoiding rigid corporate hierarchies, allowing flexible time schedules, and letting us pursue our ideas makes TwitPic a fun company to work for, and has helped to contribute to its success. So Noah, we hope you are having an awesome Boss Day and we hope that you will continue to run TwitPic with just as much awesomeness.

Add Photos to Events Automatically with Triggers

Today we launched a new feature to improve our Events system and to make it easier to organize your photos.  This new feature is called an “Event Trigger”.  Basically, it lets you specify a hash tag that, when present in a photo’s tweet, will place that photo in a certain Event.  This makes it very simple to organize your photos on the fly, and from your mobile phone, without having to manually go through all of your photos and add them to events later.

Event Triggers can be added for both new events and events you have already created.  Heres a quick guide for both cases:

Setting a Trigger for New Events

When creating an event, there is now a field below the Description named ‘Trigger’.

Screen shot 2010-07-06 at 2.29.30 PMThe trigger must be a valid Twitter hashtag.  This means it can only be comprised of letters, numbers and underscores.  No spaces, dashes, or other characters are allowed.  The form should only let you type in valid characters, but just in case, we will strip any invalid characters from the hashtag if they somehow make it into the form.

Now that you have an Event Trigger setup, all images uploaded to TwitPic with the hashtag #concert (as shown in the example above) will be automatically placed in the Concerts event.  This includes uploads from the website, 3rd party Twitter clients, and TwitPic Email.

Setting a Trigger for Existing Events

So lets say you already have some events created, but you want to add a Trigger for them.  To do so, navigate to the event page on TwitPic, and then click the small pencil icon on the right side by Event Info.  This will open the Event editor.  There is a new field below Description named ‘Trigger’.  Here, you can specify any valid Twitter hashtag to use as the Event Trigger, as shown below:

Screen shot 2010-07-06 at 2.37.18 PMAgain, the hashtag must be a valid Twitter hashtag so it can only contain letters, numbers and underscores.  After you have entered the Trigger, click Save.  Now any photo uploaded to TwitPic with the hashtag (in this case, #sunset) will be added to this event.

Final Notes

There are a few things that you should know when using Event Triggers:

  1. Only you can use your own Event Triggers.  In other words, everyone must specify their own triggers for their own events.
  2. Your event triggers must be unique among your own Events.  It’s ok if someone else uses the same trigger as you since this does not affect you, but you cannot use the same Trigger twice among your events.
  3. You can put as many Event Triggers in a tweet as you want.  The photo will be added to each Event whose Trigger is put in the tweet.
  4. Triggers are optional.  You do not have to specify a Trigger for every Event you create.

We hope everyone likes this new feature and finds it as useful as we think it will be!

Twitter Places with Photos

Today we officially announced a new feature for TwitPic that integrates some great location-aware features using Twitter’s new Places service.  For a long time, we have wanted to be able to put a location with a photo.  It adds meaning, and it is also a great tool for businesses to stay on top of things.  Since we are using Twitter Places, you can not only say that a photo was taken in “Charleston, SC”, but you can also say that the photo was taken at “Starbucks, 239 King St., Charleston, SC”, for instance.

Adding a location to photos is simple.  There are two ways you can do this:

Adding a Location to a New Photo

When you upload a photo using the TwitPic website (not a 3rd party Twitter app), there is a checkbox in the third step (Post Options) that says “Include location data”.  If this box is checked, this means that you want to specify where this photo was taken.

One thing that is important to note is that we rely on your camera’s ability to store the coordinates of where the photo was taken in order to provide you with better location services.  Almost all moderately new cell phones have this ability, and some high end digital cameras do as well.  If there is no location data stored with your photo, you will not be presented with a page to choose the photo’s location.  If you would still like to choose a location for the photo despite this, you can follow the instructions in the next section.

So once you click the Upload button on the upload page, and if your photo has location data, you will see the new Places page as shown below (click to enlarge):

Screen shot 2010-06-24 at 6.15.07 PM

From here, you can save where the photo was actually taken.  You will see nearby options listed based on where the photo was taken, although if the correct location is not shown, you can search for it, as shown below (click to enlarge):

Screen shot 2010-06-24 at 6.18.46 PM

To select a location, click on it in the list, and it will become highlighted in a pretty blue.  Click the “Save with Location” button at the bottom and voila!  It is important that you click either “Save with Location” or “Save without Location”, or else the tweet with your photo will not be sent to Twitter.

If your photo was not taken at any particular location, but you would still like to show where it was taken on the photo page, you have the option to “Use Exact Coordinates”.  This will show a pinpoint on the map showing exactly where the photo was taken.  Normally, if you choose a Place for the photo, it will show that place instead of the photo’s exact coordinates.

Adding a Location to an Existing Photo

If you would like to go back through your already uploaded photos and assign locations to them as well, then you can do that too!  Simply navigate to the photo you would like to set a location for, and click the link “add/edit location” to the right of the photo.  You will be presented with a page very similar to the one shown above.

If your photo does not have location data stored with it, you will have to search for the place manually.  In the search box, type in the name of the location and be as descriptive as possible.  We are working on refining this search, but for now it may take a few tries to find the right location.  We will also add the ability to choose an exact location by clicking on the map in the future.

Once you have chosen a location, click the “Save with Location” button.  Clicking “Delete Location” will remove the location currently saved with the photo.

Some Final Words

Twitter Places is a very important milestone in our development, but keep in mind that it is an extremely new feature.  Twitter is constantly working to improve the feature, just as we are working to improve our implementation of the feature.  If the location you are searching for is not found, chances are it will be added in the near future as Twitter expands the feature.

We hope you like the new feature, and let us know what you think!